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Tux Cake

While waiting to be served at a newsagents today I noticed The Australian Women's Weekly Party Animals: Birthday Cakes for Kids sitting there on the counter. Just about every child growing up in Australia in the last 40 years has had at least 1 cake from one of the many editions of the original The Australian Women's Weekly Kid's Birthday Cakes (formerly Children's Birthday Cakes?).

Enough reminiscing, the reason why Party Animals caught my attention was the front cover.

Australian Women's Weekly Party Animals: Birthday Cakes for Kids Cookbook front page featuring Tux (the Linux mascot

Source: ACP
That penguin looks very familiar to me.

For those of you unfamiliar with Tux - the Linux mascot, here s/he is Tux - the Linux mascot, Created by Larry Ewing using The GIMP

This is not the first time the Linux mascot has been ripped off by a company in Australia looking for a quick buck. Last year the NSW Lotteries used Tux in their Pengwins instant lottery tickets which they later licensed to the SA Lotteries.

ACP should respect the license of the Tux image and acknowledge Larry and the Gimp, and even consider publishing the recipe under a Creative Commons License. ACP's parent company PBL Media is the other half of Microsoft's Australian online joint venture - ninemsn. I am sure MS wouldn't be too happy if someone created a clippy toilet brush without licensing their design.

I quite like the idea of a Tux cake. I can think of several occasions where it would be appropriate to prepare such a creation. As Ia am not that gifted in the kitchen any instructions on how to do so would be a great help to me (and I am sure others). After thinking about it for a minute or so I decided to I pony up the cash (12.95AUD) to buy a copy of the cookbook.

There were enough other recipes which looked like suitable for my son in the coming years to make it a worthwhile purchase. Avoid the other penguin recipe on page 86 is pretty lame.

The cookbook is available from amazon.co.uk (yes that is a referral code in the link) or if you are in Australia direct from ACP (the publisher).

I will be emailing ACP and Larry links to this post and will post any replies I get from them.

While doing some googling to see if any one else has blogged on this topic, I found a post from Bruce Everett about the book.

Update I have received something back from ACP.

Very Rough Guide

When I go to the library I regularly check out what computer books are sitting on the shelf. Some books seem to be there every time I go in, such as iTunes 6 and iPod for windows and Macintosh. I usually end up grabbing one or 2 books on something I am at least vaguely interested in. I usually end up flicking through them over a month, and forget most of it a week later.

On my latest visit I picked up The Rough Guide to Blogging, by Jonathan Yang. I wasn't expecting to learn a lot out of it, but I hoped that there might be a few little gems or at least 1 thing that I didn't already know.

In general the book is ok. If you are new to blogging there is quite a few things that you can learn from reading a book like this. It seems to be pitched at people who use computers to get a job done, not geeks - that's cool. You shouldn't have to be a geek to read a book on a topic such as blogging.

Unfortunately the book's target audience probably isn't as well versed in convention and netiquette as a geek would be. As a geek reading the book I found myself thinking "hmm" on a few occasions. Then I found a wtf?! show stopper on page 79. Here is the quote under the heading "Loading images from other websites" (my emphasis):

You can use an image from elsewhere on the Web without copying it to your server. Simply find the address of the individual image (not the page it's displayed on) and use the IMG tag in the usual way.

Before posting an image on your blog, however, it's best to ask for permission from the copyright holder. In reality, nothing is likely to happen to you for using an image without permission - especially in the case of celebrity photos and other commonly circulated stock photos - but at the very least it's polite to ask before using, say, a drawing from an artist's website.

Generally hotlinking is considered by many as a copyright violation and bandwidth theft. Most webmasters don't approve of others using their content and bandwidth without permission. Not so long ago, US Senator and potential Presidential cantidate John McCain found out what happens when you hotlink. There are numerous other examples of disgruntled copyright holders and webmasters taking action against hotlinkers.

Given the size of the copyright notice in the footer on his site, Jonathan seems to take his copyright pretty seriously, pity that his respect doesn't seem to extend to others' works.

Update: I emailed Jonathan a link to this post and he has replied.

Thanks for reading and reviewing the book. The section you referenced about "hotlinking." Definitely not good blogger etiquette. I should probably post something about the importance of not only asking permission but also hosting your own images. I hope I meant "use the images, but host them yourself" but clearly the text doesn't reflect that.

Further Update: Jonathan has posted a clarification post on his blog (since moved to a different url).