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Zoom's Make or Break Moment

Zoom is experiencing massive growth as large sections of the workforce transition to working from home. At the same time many problems with Zoom are coming to light. This is their make or break moment. If they fix the problems they end up with a killer video conferencing app. The alternative is that they join Cisco's Webex in the dumpster fire of awful enterprise software.

In the interest of transparency I am a paying Zoom customer and I use it for hours every day. I also use Webex (under protest) as it is a client's video conferencing platform of choice.

In the middle of last year Jonathan Leitschuh disclosed two bugs in zoom with security and privacy implications . There was a string of failures that lead to these bugs. To Zoom’s credit they published a long blog post about why these “features” were there in the first place.

Over the last couple of weeks other issues with Zoom have surfaced. “Zoom bombing” or using random 9 digit numbers to find meetings has become a thing. This is caused by zoom’s meeting rooms having a 9 digit code to join. That’s really handy when you have to dial in and enter the number on your telephone keypad. The down side is that you have a 1 in 999 999 999 chance of joining a meeting when using a random number. Zoom does offer the option of requiring a password or PIN for each call. Unfortunately it isn’t the default. Publishing a blog post on how to secure your meetings isn’t enough, the app needs to be more secure by default. The app should default to enabling a 6 digit PIN when creating a meeting.

The Intercept is reporting Zoom’s marketing department got a little carried away when describing the encryption used in the product. This is an area where words matter. Encryption in transit is a base line requirement in communication tools these days. Zoom has this, but their claims about end to end encryption appear to be false. End to end encryption is very important for some use cases. I await the blog post explaining this one.

I don’t know why Proton Mail’s privacy issues blog post got so much attention. This appears to be based on someone skimming the documentation rather than any real testing. Regardless the post got a lot of traction. Some of the same issues were flagged by the EFF.

Until recently zoom’s FAQ read “Does Zoom sell Personal Data? […] Depends what you mean by ‘sell’”. I’m sure that sounded great in a meeting but it is worrying when you read it as a customer. Once called out on social media it was quickly updated and a blog post published. In the post, Zoom assures users it isn’t selling their data.

Joseph Cox reported late last week that Zoom was sending data to Facebook every time someone used their iOS app. It is unclear if Joe gave Zoom an opportunity to fix the issue before publishing the article. The company pushed out a fix after the story broke.

The most recent issue broke yesterday about the Zoom macOS installer behaving like malware. This seems pretty shady behaviour, like their automatic reinstaller that was fixed last year. To his credit, Zoom Founder and CEO, Eric Yuan engaged with the issue on twitter. This will be one to watch over the coming days.

Over the last year I have seen a consistent pattern when Zoom is called out on security and valid privacy issues with their platform. They respond publicly with “oops my bad” blog posts . Many of the issues appear to be a result of them trying to deliver a great user experience. Unfortunately they some times lean too far toward the UX and ignore the security and privacy implications of their choices. I hope that over the coming months we see Zoom correct this balance as problems are called out. If they do they will end up with an amazing platform in terms of UX while keeping their users safe.

Update Since publishing this post additional issues with Zoom were reported. Zoom's CEO announced the company was committed to fixing their product.